Chicago’s Whiskey Connection to Ireland

e-mail icon
Monday, November 18, 2013 - 9:20pm

Walk through the international arrivals terminal of O’Hare and you’ll see the flags and art work of Chicago’s “sister cities” in Europe, Asia and South America. One city missing from the sister cities program is Tullamore, Ireland, home to Tullamore D.E.W. Irish Whiskey.

Similar to Chicago, the town of Tullamore suffered a tremendous fire in 1785 and a third of the town was destroyed. As a result of the fire, Tullamore adopted the Phoenix as their town crest and showed future cities that optimism and hard work can overcome even the worst disasters.

Because we had the same strength to rebuild after the Great Chicago Fire, Tullamore D.E.W. chose Chicago as the national launching point for their new limited edition Tullamore D.E.W. Phoenix. The new edition celebrates the courage and optimism of the Tullamore people who, like Chicagoans, were driven by a positive spirit to rebuild - and ultimately establish the Tullamore Distillery in 1829. 

And while I can attempt to wax poetically about the incredibly smooth taste and distinctive toffee notes of the new Phoenix edition, I’ll let Tullamore D.E.W.’s global brand ambassador John Quinn explain everything in the video below.  


Tullamore D.E.W. Phoenix is a great Christmas or birthday gift for your whiskey loving friends, co-worker or your favorite TLT Bar and Nightlife writer. The limited edition release now available for $54.99 per bottle.

 

Joe Piehl's picture
Chicago Editor Joe Piehl
Joe Piehl

A TLT contributor since 2010, Joe is the Chicago Editor. Outside TLT, Joe keeps an eye out for awesome activities and he writes a travel blog: Joe the Explorer.

e-mail icon

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments

Be in the know!

Sign up free for events and updates!

Join the TLTeam Today

Do you love Chicago? You could join our exclusive TLTeam of contributors!

Apply Now to join the TLTeam!

We also accept guest posts. If you'd like to write a guest post please apply here.